VIDEO ROOM

Video Room has been serving the Piedmont Avenue neighborhood since 1988. We carry a large selection of movies on DVD and have an ever growing Blu-ray library. We specialize in hard-to-find and obscure cult classics, TV shows, foreign cinema, and film noir, in addition to the latest new releases. Check out our large Directors section and offbeat categories that make us unique. Kids and dogs are welcome. Senior discounts available. We do same day reservations. Free parking.

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Tuesday, June 22, 2010

New Releases - June 22, 2010

Cry of the Owl, The [2009] - Based on a Patricia Highsmith (Strangers on a Train, TheTalented Mr. Ripley) novel, this noir thriller stars Julia Stiles as a young woman who finds herself attracted to a strange man (Paddy Considine) who is stalking her. When her boyfriend goes missing, he becomes the main suspect in the crime, but things are not what they seem. Co-starring Caroline Dhravernas, Gordon Rand, and James Gilbert. If you like this movie, you might want to also check out the 1987 version, which we have in rental, that French mystery master Claude Chabrol directed in 1987. Directed by James Thraves. 2009. 16x9 Widescreen. 99 minutes. R.

Death Race 2000 [2010 remaster] - Paul Bartel (Eating Raoul) directed this terrific cult comedy classic about a futuristic society that goes wild over a sadistic long distance car race in which the driver who kills the most people with his car wins. Most of the drivers are demented cartoon characters, including the steely anti-hero lead named Frankenstein (wonderfully played by a tongue-in-cheek David Carradine). The excellent and fun supporting cast includes Simone Griffith as Frankenstein's super hot co-pilot, Sylvester Stallone in one of his earliest starring roles as Carradine's mafioso nemesis, cult icon Mary Woronov (from Rock 'n' Roll High School), Roberta Collins, and Martin Kove. Watch for cameos by cult directors Joe Dante, Paul Bartel, and Martin Scorsese. With commentaries, featurettes, and interviews. 1975. 16x9 Widescreen. 78 minutes. R.

Dog City The Movie - This Emmy winner directed by Jim Henson is a dog muppet film noir satire which should be fun for the whole family. 1989. Full Screen. 40 Minutes. $2 rental. Unrated.



Entourage: Season 6 - Adrian Grenier, Kevin Connolly, Jerry Ferrara, Kevin Dillon and multi-award winner Jeremy Piven return for a 6th season of this great HBO sitcom about an actor's (Grenier) struggle to keep his career alive in Hollywood with the help or hurt of his entourage of pals, agents and various hanger-ons. All epis are spread across 3 discs. With featurettes and commentaries. 3 separate rentals. 2009. 16x9 Widescreen. Unrated.

Family Guy: Volume 8 -Everybody's favorite rude animated TV family is back with an ok if not great season if you read the internet. All 15 epis spread across 3 DVDs. With commentary, deleted scenes. Karaoke, and featurette. 3 separate rentals. 2009. Full Screen. Unrated.

Good Guy, The - Alexis Bledel (Gilmore Girls) plays a young New Yorker who falls for a Wall Street hotshot (Scott Porter), but things get complicated when she meets his shy co-worker (Bryan Greenburg).Andrew McCarthy, Aaron Yoo, and Anna Chlumsky co-star in this drama. With commentary. Directed by Julio DePietro. 2010. 16x9 Widescreen. 91 minutes. R.

Green Zone - Based loosely on true stories, this political action drama re-teams Matt Damon and The Bourne Supremacy director Paul Greengrass. Damon plays a rogue US Army officer who must search the dangerous areas in Iraq to see if he can find Weapons of Mass Destruction before war is declared. The fine cast includes Greg Kinnear, Brendan Gleeson, Amy Ryan, and Jason Isaacs. With deleted scenes, featurette and commentary. Directed by Paul Greengrass. 2010. 16x9 Widescreen. 115 minutes. R.

Just Like the Son - In this indie drama, Mark Webber stars as a young petty thief who befirends an 8 year old boy (A.J. Ortiz) while doing community service at a Greenwich Village elementary school. When the boy's mother takes ill and he's put in a foster school, Webber whisks him away on an eventful road trip. Also starring Brandon Sexton III, and Rosie Perez. With featurette and interviews. Directed by Morgan J. Freeman (Hurricane Streets). 2009. 16x9 Widescreen. 80 minutes. PG-13.

Last Station, The - Christopher Plummer and Heln Mirren give dazzling performances as famous Russian novelist Tolstoy and his wife during the last days of his life. Already distracted by his aide's (Paul Giamatti) machinations to deprive his future widow of the rights and financial royalties from his works, Tolstoy's life is also changed when a young secretary (James McAvoy) who idolizes him arrives. Anne-Marie Duff and Kerry Condon co-star. Mirren was nominated for a Best Actress Academy Award and Plummer was nominated for Best Supporting Actor (which is rather odd since he has a lead role). With deleted scenes and commentaries. Directed by Michael Hoffman. 16x9 Widescreen. 113 minutes. R.

Red Desert [2010 remaster] - Although visually stunning, this existential classic from Michaelangelo Antonioni (Blow Up and Zabriskie Point) still has the power to polarize audiences who will either be fascinated or want to take a nap. Monica Vitti, an Antonioni favorite, is striking as a bored and beautiful wife who spends time flirting with her husband's co-worker (played by a rather grim Richard Harris) amidst a desolate and bleak backdrop that includes power plants, pollution, and decay. As with many Antonioni classics, the background is a massive and oppressive symbol that mankind has reached a pinnacle of waste and useless technology. This being his first color film also shows his extraordinary gift for using shades of reds and browns to suit his symbolic needs. In Italian with English subtitles. With commentary and docus. 1964. 16x9 Widescreen. 117 minutes. Unrated.

Remember Me - This chick flick received mixed reviews overall when it came out, but the folks on Amazon are starting to rave about it as a moving, well-acted and underrated romantic drama. Robert Pattinson (the heartthrob everyone knows from the Twilight series) plays a well-to-do NYU college student, who lost his brother to suicide and resents his divorced dad (Pierce Brosnan) because he seems disconnected from him. When the aimless student is caught by a cop (Chris Cooper) trying to break up a fight instead of starting one, he plans to get revenge on Cooper by dating and dumping his daughter (played by Lost's Emilie De Ravin), but that plan backfires when he falls in love with the fellow student. As he finds happiness, the world around him may have a different ending in mind. Get out your handkerchiefs or at least a box of Kleenex. Co-starring Lena Olin, Tate Ellington, and Ruby Jenkins. With commentaries and featurettes. Directed by Allen Coulter. 2010. 16x9 Widescreen. 112 minutes. PG-13.

Shaun the Sheep: One Giant Leap for Lambkind -Kids' favorite animated sheep is back in 5 more epis including one about Shaun having a close encounter. $2 rental. 2010. Full Screen. Unrated. 38 minutes $2 rental.

She's Out of My League - Jay Baruchel (Knocked Up) stars in this very funny farce as a normal guy who attracts and starts dating a super-hot babe (Alice Eve) who's out his league, creating havoc, envy and ire among his friends, colleagues and even casual observers. T. J. Miller, Mike Vogel, Nate Torrence, Krysten Ritter, Geoff Stults, and Lindsay Sloane also star in this rude comedy aimed at the Judd Apatow crowd. With deleted scenes, featurettes, and commentary. Directed by Jim Field-Smith. 16x9 Widescreen. R. 104 minutes. R.

Shinjuku Incident - Jackie Chan plays it pretty serious for a change in this action drama period piece about a Chinese immigrant who tries to work while finding a lost love in Japan. Fighting the oppression he and his fellow immgrants endure, he ends up defending his compatriots by aligning himself with a yakuza boss, leading to a violent showdown with rival gangs. Chan, eschewing his normal but wild martial arts stunts and charming humor, gives a surprisingly good serious performance, perhaps setting up his transition from all-out physical roles to more deep character acting as he ages gracefully. Another surprise is that this film was banned from screening in mainland China because it was deemed too violent. Also starring Naoto Takenaka, Daniel Wu, Xu Jinglei, Masaya Kato, Fan Bingbing, Toru Minegishi, Kenya, Jack Kao, Paul Chun, Lam Suet, and Hiroyuki Nagato. With commentary and featurette. Directed by Derek Yee. 2009. 16x9 Widescreen. 120 minutes. R.

Star Is Born, A [1954 - New 2010 Remaster] - Judy Garland gives her greatest performance in this remake of the Janet Gaynor-Fredric March classic about a talented young actress who is championed by an alcoholic movie star who falls in love with her but is tragically eclipsed by his discovery. This rich Technicolor classic, of course, changes Garland's character to a struggling singer, who catches the ear and eye of a heavy drinking leading man (brilliantly played by James Mason), who does fall in love with her and brings his new discovery to the head of the studio (Charles Bickford). He makes her into a musical actress/star, but as her star rises, his career falls, leading to tragedy. Garland gives a heartbreaking multi-layered performance, buoyed by great musical numbers (like It's a New World and The Man That Got Away). After the film's initial release, it was edited from it's 3 hour roadshow length to 154 minutes with devastating results, including the cutting of several character building scenes and the truncating of numerous excellent musical humbers. In 1983, it was restored to 170 minutes using outtakes and stills and audio segments to restore as much of the original as possible. Now, due to Blu-ray technology, Warner Home Video has restored it again with an even better picture thanks to a high def master and improved sound. Also starring Jack Carson and Tom Noonan. 2 discs. With over 4 hours of special features including deleted scenes, alternate musical takes, featurettes, promos, trailers, radio shows, sound outtakes and more. Directed by George Cukor. 1954. 16x9 Widescreen. 176 minutes. Unrated. TRIVIA NOTES: Listen for an audio cameo by Humphrey Bogart (as a drunk who asks Garland to sing "Melancholy Baby"). SPOILER ALERT. A funny inside joke in Hollywood circles involves the ending in which Mason commits suicide by walking into the ocean. The suicide is obviously tragic and not funny, but it is funny that Mason's next film was 20,000 Leagues Under the Sea and that Mason next shows up on film as Captain Nemo underwater !

Timer - This indie romcom has a great premise: in the future, men and women will have little devices installed in them that start beeping when they meet their one true love. Unfortunately, for one woman (charmingly played by Emma Caulfield), the device either does not seem to work when she wants it to, or the men she finds lovable are not part of the subscription service and don't want to be. So, what's a beautiful, single woman to do? Co-starring Michelle Borth, John Patrick Amedori, Desmond Harrington, Kali Rocha, and Jobeth Williams. With commentary, featurette and deleted scenes. Directed by Jac Schaeffer. 2010. 16x9 Widescreen. 99 minutes. R.

Blu-rays:



Death Race 2000


Green Zone

Last Station, The


Saving Private Ryan - Tom Hanks, Edward Burns, Matt Damon, and Tom Sizemore star in this instant war classic directed by Best Director Oscar winner Steven Spielberg. With the epic D-Day invasion as a backdrop, a troop of soldiers (led by Hanks) try to find a young missing private (Damon) before he meets the same fate that his 3 brothers have, dying in combat. Possibly the most realistic, brutal and visceral war film ever made, it is based on a true story. This terrific looking and sounding Blu-ray is the corrected re-release version [a technical sound glitch in the first pressing spurred a total recall by Dreamworks]. 2 discs. With featurettes. 1998. 1080p Widescreen. 169 minutes. R.

Descriptions written by manager Steven Y. Mori

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